Worldwide Acceptance

Subhead Goes Here

Following its patent in 1824, portland cement has continued to evolve, but the basic formulation is much like the original product. The predominant cement used in North America remains portland cement, yet most countries in Europe have shifted heavily toward blended cements (including their versions of PLCs) because they offer similar performance with lower environmental footprints. 

In order to specify PLC for projects, you have to know what to ask for. In the U.S., PLC is specified as ASTM C595 Type IL (read as “one-ell”) cement and in Canada, PLC is specified as CSA A3000 Type GUL (read as “G-U-L”). 

 

While many departments of transportation permit Type IL cements in their construction projects under ASTM C595, for others, AASHTO M 240 Type IL is the proper specification reference. (All of the technical requirements of ASTM C595 and AASHTO M 240 are the same.) Note that some DOTs are still evaluating portland-limestone cements (see the map on the upper right of this page.)

 

Type IL is permitted:

  • By codes, like ACI 318, Building Code Requirements for Structural Concrete

  • By specifications, like ACI 301, Specification for Structural Concrete

  • By standards, like ASTM C94, Specification for Ready Mixed Concrete

  • And by the AIA MasterSpec that is used by design firms to develop their specifications for private projects.

Click here for more information on adding PLC to your specifications.

Sources:

What is Portland-Limestone Cement?

by PCA (cement.org)

Reducing Our Footprint

by Rediscover Concrete (rediscoverconcrete.com)

Learn More:


Environmental Product Declaration (EPD): Blended Cements
by PCA/ASTM
View/Download PDF

Environmental Product Declaration (EPD): General Use (GU) and Portland-Limestone (GUL) Cements

by the Cement Association of Canada (CAC)

View/Download PDF

PLC Acceptance Map 9-2020.jpg

Related Links

© 2020 Portland Cement Association. All rights reserved. cement.org

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter